Wednesday, February 24, 2010

172: It's God's Plan

Psalm 40-45
As the deer pants for streams of water, so my soul pants for you, O God. - Psalm 42:1 [Best pickup line ever?]

Psalm 40 (David): God helps David in this chapter (as opposed to almost killing him). David again asks for mercy from God. He's probably going to need it within the next few chapters when God's bipolar disorder flares up.

Psalm 41 (David): If you have regard for the weak you are blessed. David's enemies are after him again. David prays for mercy. [The end of Book I]

BOOK II
Psalm 42 (Sons of Korah): The sons of Korah pant for God, whatever that means (sounds dirty). They also call God a rock, he must like that. However, they too complain to God because he's never around and their enemies are dominating him. Apparently God doesn't reserve his bipolar disorder for David.

Psalm 43 (No Author): God has rejected yet another lost soul. The whole Psalm is someone crying out to God for blessing.

Psalm 44 (Sons of Korah): The sons of Korah say that they haven't done anything wrong, yet God still crushes them under his feet. Maybe Satan made more than one wager?
Awake, O Lord! Why do you sleep?
Rouse yourself! Do not reject us forever.

Why do you hide your face
and forget our misery and oppression?
What happened to the miraculous God that was around all the time? Why does everyone in the Psalms tell God to stop hiding? I think the bible is turning me into a deist (or it would be if I believed what it was telling me).

Psalm 45 (Sons of Korah): This is a wedding song (says the title of the chapter). It's about, well, a wedding. The sons of Korah tell the bride and groom that they are going to be blessed forever. Wishful thinking.

*News*
Layla Grace is going to die. Her mother has decided to blog/tweet about it for the past 10 months. What brings you to blog about your child's demise confounds me, but that's not what I'm going to talk about.

What I am going to talk about is my absolute lack of comprehension of how people keep their faith as God kills their children (if you believe God does everything, you believe God is killing your child, Layla's mother is one of these people). As I skim through Layla and her mother's journey, from naive optimism, to slim hope, to Layla's certain death, I can't help but feel disgusted at any all powerful being that would stand by and allow this to happen. Layla's mother and her 13,000 twitter followers have been praying for the past ten months for the eventual miraculous recovery of this poor two year old girl. What has it gotten them? False hope, maybe.

I don't mean to reinforce an ignorant stereotype here, I don't hate God. I don't think he exists. But if someone somehow proved to me that God did exist, this would make me absolutely loathe him. No amount of "God has a complicated plan" makes up for this. No plan should involve slowly killing two year olds. If that's your plan, make a new one! To those that truly believe in God, how do you reconcile this? What hoops does your mind have to jump through to make slowly suffocating children in their own bodily fluid ok? I, for one, would be supremely pissed at God.

Dear hypothetical all-loving God,

You sure have a funny way of showing your love for humanity.

Bryan

(LaylaGrace.org) [Twitter: @LaylaGrace]

2 comments:

  1. and you just outlined what confirmed my lack of belief in any supreme being. i questioned for years, then it just hit me- no one with an ounce of compassion would not only allow things like this to happen, but cause it directly. It's insane to think so, imho. No thanks, i'm good with no god.

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  2. "No one can believe in a good God if they've sat at the bedside of a dying child." [supposedly Bertrand Russell]

    It looks like all it takes to challenge a stodgy, heavily educated British 'revolter against idealism' is one American mother in pain over her child and holding on to each thread of hope she can find.

    I think the real lesson here (although I really do like the comment "i'm good with no god") is that this suffering is not a solitary thing -- it's obviously a shared burden in which we all can participate or at least find connection.

    (meh, too deep?)

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